Rwanda - Kayumbu Tvättstation 250g

125 kr 

  • Rwanda - Kayumbu Tvättstation 250g
  • Rwanda - Kayumbu Tvättstation 250g

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Location: Kamonyi District
Altitude: Approximately 2000 meters
Varietal: Red Bourbon, Jackson
Process: Honey
Harvest: March - June
Roast profile - Light
Flavor profile - Caramel Blood orange Chocolate Citrus Fruit Milk Chocolate Red Currant Sweet & Sugary Yellow kiwi

Kayumbu Washing Station was built by the Rwandan army. Army-built stations are constructed to receive huge volumes of cherry each season. Rwacof purchased the station in 2013 and has been working with the 1,055+ farmers delivering cherry to the station ever since. 

Rwacof’s farmer training program focuses on empowering smallholder farmers by fostering sustainable, high-quality coffee production.  

The farmers who deliver their cherry to Kayumbu station are flush with options of nearby washing station. Kayumbu has very high-quality standards, but in order to be competitive, they must accept nearly all cherry delivered. If they do not, the farmer will choose to go to a different station next time in order to sell more of their crop and avoid the hassle of sorting.

After purchasing cherry from producers, workers send the cherry through a strict sorting process. First, washing station staff remove any lower quality cherry through flotation. Then, a specially trained staff visually inspects the remaining cherry for any visual defects.

After sorting, cherry is pulped on a Pinhalese pulper outfitted and then laid out to sun dry on raised beds. While drying, the coffee is regularly sorted to remove imperfections and sifted to ensure even drying.

In concert with our sustainability partner, Kahawatu Foundation, Sucafina Rwanda (Rwacof) invests heavily in farmer training and good agricultural practices. Rwacof’s Farmer Field School shares information with all their producer partners about best agricultural practices, conservation tactics, the importance of picking only ripe cherry and more. 

Furthermore, Rwacof is focused on improving the financial situation of the farmers with whom they work. Annual bonuses are always distributed once the coffee is sold. As part of Sucafina’s innovative Farmer Hub program, these second payments are deposited into zero-fee bank accounts. Second payments are typically given as cash. Through our Farmer Hub program, these bank accounts offer wider-reaching benefits, including more secure storage for their money and the opportunity to build a financial credit history & give them access to credit lines with better interest rates.

Above all, Rwacof's exceptional attention to detail during post-harvest activities ensures the best quality coffee possible. From the moment cherry enters the washing station until it is milled and bagged for export, Rwacof keeps stringent quality controls in place. They know, as we do, that high quality coffee is crucial for delivering benefit all along the supply chain. 

Despite its turbulent history, today Rwanda is one of the specialty coffee world’s darlings – for good reason! Our sister company in Rwanda does an amazing job of bringing the best that Rwanda has to offer to roasters around the world.

German missionaries and settlers brought coffee to Rwanda in the early 1900s. Largescale coffee production was established during the 1930 & 1940s by the Belgian colonial government. Coffee production continued after the Belgian colonists left. By 1970, coffee had become the single largest export in Rwanda and accounted for 70% of total export revenue. Coffee was considered so valuable that, beginning in 1973, it was illegal to tear coffee trees out of the ground.

Between 1989 and 1993, the breakdown of the International Coffee Agreement (ICA) caused the global price to plummet. The Rwandan government and economy took a hard hit from low global coffee prices. The 1994 genocide and its aftermath led to a complete collapse of coffee exports and vital USD revenue, but the incredible resilience of the Rwandan people is evident in the way the economy and stability have recovered since then.

Modern Rwanda is considered one of the most stable countries in the region. Since 2003, its economy has grown by 7-8% per year and coffee production has played a key role in this economic growth. Coffee has also played a role in Rwanda's significant advancements towards gender equality. New initiatives that cater to women and focus on helping them equip themselves with the tools and knowledge for farming have been changing the way women view themselves and interact with the world around them.

Today, smallholders propel the industry in Rwanda forward. The country doesn’t have any large estates. Most coffee is grown by the 400,000+ smallholders, who own less than a  quarter of a hectare. The majority of Rwanda’s coffee production is Arabica. Bourbon variety plants comprise 95% of all coffee trees cultivated in Rwanda.

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